Dartmouth College Black Visual Arts Center

Dartmouth College Black Visual Arts Center

Visual Arts Takes Center Stage with Triple-Glazed Glass Fin Facades

 

Creativity comes from many places and in a myriad of forms. The one unifying aspect of creativity is that the creator needs to be inspired and is almost always affected by their surrounding environment. That mantra was exactly the goal of the Dartmouth College Black Visual Arts Center located in Hanover, New Hampshire. Apollo Global Management co-founder Leon Black and his wife Debra contributed $48 million to create a state-of-the-art visual arts center at Dartmouth College. The building’s namesake and benefactor Leon Black graduated summa cum laude from Dartmouth College in 1973 with a major in philosophy and history and received an MBA from Harvard Business School in 1975. Debra Black, an avid lover of the arts and accomplished Broadway producer, graduated from Barnard College in 1976. The 105,000-square-foot facility that bears the Black family name houses the departments of Studio Art, Film, and Media Studies, including a Digital Humanities program. This all-inclusive art center hub contains classrooms, exhibition space, a 40-seat screening room, the 243-seat Loew Auditorium, faculty and administrative offices, and a shared digital humanities media laboratory. This center takes full advantage of advanced technology, and its strategic location in Dartmouth’s arts district of campus, to connect the visual arts with the other humanities and science departments in shaping and preparing students to assume their future roles as artists and cultural leaders.

 

 

For this project, the educational institution looked to an architecture firm that had a wealth of education and “arts & culture” background selecting Boston-based architects Machado Silvetti. The Machado Silvetti team took a neighborhood-based approach, addressing each distinct set of requirements through strategic adjacencies—placing the print-making classrooms and support spaces together in a back chemistry corridor, and keeping the workshop separate from the digital media labs to reduce sound transfer. Uniting all six areas of departments under the one roof had a significant impact on teaching and the possibility for collaboration between studio art faculty members. Also, being housed in the same building with film, media studies, and digital humanities increased the opportunities for multidisciplinary collaboration between students as well.

 

 

The architects worked with construction manager Suffolk Construction to construct the building for the college. Natural light and visual transparency was a key to the overall functionality and tone of the building. W&W Glass worked closely with the architect and installers New Hampshire Glass to create a striking and inviting environment. W&W Glass’ design for the Pilkington Planar™ system vertical lantern walls included triple-glazed, Pilkington Optiwhite™ low-iron silk-screened insulating face glass units with HP 70/39 low-e on the number two surface using a custom white silk-screened custom “frit” pattern on the number three surface as well as non-fritted glazed areas. The triple-glazing was desired by the project team to provide the ultimate in energy performance in New Hampshire’s cold climate. Pilkington is one of the few manufacturers in the world that can manufacture triple-glazed, point-supported insulating glass units. All vertical tempered glass fins were Optiwhite low-iron glass as well for high transparency. All point-supported glass panels were fastened to the glass fins with Pilkington Planar™ 905 series countersunk stainless steel fittings.

 


More than one-fourth of Dartmouth students enroll each year in courses in visual art, film studies, and digital humanities, including theory, criticism, and studio classes. The Black Family Visual Arts Center provides expanded resources for students and faculty alike, including classrooms, faculty offices, an exhibition gallery showcasing student work and a shared digital humanities media laboratory. The center also provides education in photography, architecture, painting, and drawing studios, as well as cutting-edge film production, animation, and editing spaces. 

 

W&W Glass LLC is a family-owned business with a 70-year history in the metal and glass industry, one of the largest metal and glass companies in the New York metropolitan area and the largest supplier of structural glass systems in the country. We have over two decades of experience in the design and installation of various building enclosure systems, including stick-built curtain walls, pre-glazed unitized curtain walls, Pilkington Planar structural glass facades, and custom metal and glass enclosure systems. We install all of our work with our own dedicated union labor force. W&W Glass is consistently the largest employer of glaziers in the NY metropolitan area. W&W Glass is located at 302 Airport Executive Park, Nanuet, NY 10954-5285.

 

 

 

 

 

The Columbia Business School Gets a New Home

The Columbia Business School Gets A New Home – Where Business and Social Experience Meet.

 

These days, it’s not all just about textbook theory and lectures, as the main teaching method at business schools. Due to the changing nature of business and the increased viability of social media as a major source for information and interactions, business schools too are adapting to find ways to become more “social” to increase student engagement and learning to help devise innovative business solutions for the 21st century.

 

The new home for the Columbia Business School is based on an exchange of ideas and social interactions in different settings (formal and informal) combined with advanced technology. Student engagement with the surrounding neighborhood is also a fundamental component with each classroom having view to the exterior neighborhood and landscape.

 

Photo courtesy of Columbia Business School

 

It’s rare to have an opportunity to be able to expand in the highly populated area of Harlem, but after calling Uris Hall home for more than a half century, Columbia Business School has begun constructing a complex located on Columbia University’s new 17-acre Manhattanville campus.

 

To say the new buildings are conspicuous would be an understatement. Columbia Business School’s twin structures will span approximately 492,000 square feet with a 40,000-square-foot open area already nicknamed “The Square”. World-renowned businessmen Ronald Perelman, chairman and CEO of MacAndrews & Forbes Holdings, and Henry Kravis, co-founder and co-CEO of the leveraged buyout firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. donated large gifts towards the construction of the project. Kravis gave a landmark gift of $125 million, while Perelman provided a gift of $100 million for the complex. Both donors are members of the School’s Board of Overseers, while Kravis is a Columbia Business School alumnus. The buildings honor that generosity by naming the twin structures The Ronald O. Perelman Center for Business Innovation and the Henry R. Kravis Building. The new facilities will host graduate-level schools and research centers.

 

Perelman and Kravis are not the only familiar names that will be attached to the project as the endeavor is a large collaboration of some of the best people and firms in the industry. Both structures are designed by the renowned New York architecture firm Diller Scofidio & Renfro (DS+R) in collaboration with FXCollaborative (formerly FXFOWLE Architects) as executive architect. While obvious by the modern appearance in the renderings, the project is not about typical bricks and mortar. There is actually an underlying theme about transforming the School, business education, and the nature of business itself through both buildings integrated flows and expressions of form.

The school tapped Turner Construction as the construction manager but needed a trusted, specialized partner when it came to the sophisticated design and techniques for constructing the primarily glass outer appearance. The team selected W&W Glass as the overall facade supplier and erector who is teaming up with IDA International Inc. of Derby, CT to install the Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete (GFRC) portion of the building and AZA INT – responsible for design, engineering, and fabrication of the glass facade systems, which was the preferred Italian manufacturer selected by W&W.

 

Photo courtesy of Columbia Business School

 

W&W’s selection was based on the firm’s value proposition, bringing an integrated design assist approach and long successful track record in constructing other education facilities throughout the New York City area. Some examples of W&W’s work can be found at the Columbia University Northwest Corner Building and the latest projects at Cornell University’s new Cornell Tech campus at Roosevelt Island showcased by The Bloomberg Center and The Tata Innovation Center.

Both of these new structures at Columbia Business School include a very high level of system coordination and integration for their facades, combining multiple components, installation trades, and companies. There is a significant amount of Business Information Modeling (BIM) that is crucial to this project, as the facades at times bring together three different manufacturers’ products in the same plane. The bespoke design calls for an intricate meshing of glass systems, metal panel, and GFRC panels. The key manufacturers are located in different countries, with glass manufactured in Europe and the curtain wall systems manufacturer AZA INT fabricating products in northern Italy. W&W Glass and AZA INT had recently teamed up together on a New York City project along The High Line called The Getty, designed by Peter Marino Architect. AZA INT is specialized in complete, engineered facade packages. They develop and design unique facade geometries and building envelopes in glass, metal, wood, and other materials for customers.

 

The solution proposed to the team by AZA INT meets the design needs and stringent performance criteria required for this project. It was especially important for these products to have excellent acoustics to cut down on traffic/road noise, with the project site being located so close to the Henry Hudson Parkway. This performance was verified by third-party mock-up testing. That said, the high degree of transparency is certainly the blueprint of Columbia’s project and main goal. The fabricated glass products themselves will be sourced from both Germany and Spain, depending on the facade type. There are three different 4-sided structurally-glazed curtain wall types being used on the buildings:  a stick built aluminum mullion system, a unitized aluminum curtain wall system, and a unitized system fastened onto laminated glass/steel vertical mullions. Overall, the total project requires almost 162,000 sqft of curtain wall. In addition to the glazing systems, there are also varying-shaped horizontal bands of Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete (GFRC) materials that will be made by DKI (David Kucera Inc.), which is located in Gardiner, New York.

 

Photo courtesy of Columbia Business School

 

Most of 2018 is being utilized for mock-up testing, engineering, and coordination of shop drawing details with BIM modeling between trades to alleviate potential conflicts between materials and to best understand how the assemblies merge together with all of the angles, planes, and curves.

 

Recognizing that creativity, innovation, and communication—skills that often flourish in more informal, collaborative environments—are as important to contemporary business school pedagogy as the traditional, quantitative skills best taught in a classroom, the building’s internal spaces are organized around two distinct networks that foster more informal interactions between the student and faculty of the school. The west building Commons is an urban–scale living room for students, faculty, and staff, while the east building Forum is a terraced interior landscape that doubles as a 300–seat lecture hall. Each network is a combination of circulation routes, lounge spaces, dining facilities, and study rooms that facilitate planned and unplanned interaction 24 hours a day. The excitement for the project is continuously building as excavation and foundations are underway, but the finished product is not scheduled for completion until 2021. Stay tuned for more information as the project progresses!

 

For more information on all the projects completed and underway by the W&W Glass professionals, go to www.wwglass.com and look under the portfolio section. W&W Glass LLC is a family owned business with a 70-year history in the metal and glass industry, one of the largest metal and glass companies in the New York metropolitan area and the largest supplier of structural glass systems in the country. We have over two decades of experience in the design and installation of various building enclosure systems, including stick-built curtain walls, pre-glazed unitized curtain walls, Pilkington Planar structural glass facades, and custom metal and glass enclosure systems. We install all of our work with our own dedicated union labor force. W&W is consistently the largest employer of glaziers in the NY metropolitan area.

 

Marist College Lowell Thomas Communications Center

Making a Magnificent Entrance at Marist

 

While many firms tout their expertise in new construction installations, it takes a specialty firm for consultation and erection on high profile renovation projects. Renovations can test the creativity and expertise of even the most sophisticated firms more than new builds due to existing unknown issues and restrictions (often only uncovered upon building probes and demolition). Schedule on these types of projects can also be tight due to the need to limit the duration of time the exposed building area can be open to the elements, current occupancy requirements, and having limited installation time available. These renovations may drastically change the look and feel of the building through repositioning… thereby adding a new entrance, completely remodeling the interior, or dealing with necessary modifications/improvements to meet updated building codes and standards.

 

W&W Glass is one of the few companies that developers, owners, and architectural designers seek out for both new builds and renovations. One such renovation project that W&W’s glazing system expertise was compulsory on was for the glass lobby entrance renovations at the Lowell Thomas Communications Center at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York in 2014. The Lowell Thomas Communications Center originally opened in 1987 and is named after the broadcast pioneer, explorer, and longtime resident of Dutchess County himself who had received an honorary doctorate from Marist in 1981. The Center provides space for communications, math, and computer science studies. 

 


All of the classrooms on the ground and first floors were redone with a modern look and outfitted with modern technology. Each was upgraded to provide a dedicated computer that came with a projector screen and other media outlets. All of the rooms also now have a lighting system which allows for dimming and other selective lighting inside. The ground floor houses Marist College’s radio station, WMAR, which was also renovated for students to use throughout the year. The second floor lobby and outside of the building were upgraded (like many others on the campus) to match the visual design standards of the rest of the buildings with specific types of brick/stone cladding. For the entrance renovations there was a strong desire for more natural light. Working with Hibbs Architects in the Hudson Valley, W&W Glass was selected by the school to aid in design and installation of the transparent Pilkington Planar™ structural glass systems to bring in more natural light and give the entire building a new focal point.

 

 

 

W&W Glass’ team used Pilkington Optiwhite™ low-iron insulating glass units with “K” low-e on the #3 surface for the exterior façades on the East and North of the building. Optiwhite low-iron monolithic fins were used to support the face glass on the East wall main entry mounted with Pilkington Planar™ 905 series stainless steel fitting hardware. One of the most exquisite features of the renovation was a new 18-foot wide by 7-foot deep vestibule with a glass roof and canopy that seamlessly integrated into the all glass facade. 

 

 

The tempered glass fins were made of monolithic glass while the roof, glass beams, and canopy glass used SentryGlas® laminated glass panels for additional strength and stability. The glass vestibule hardware is a combination of standard Pilkington 905 fittings, 902 fittings, spring plates, and custom connections. One of the biggest challenges was the clean integration of the door panic hardware and pivots into the glass roof. Custom stainless steel door headers and close coordination was required to make this area work together. Another major challenge was to support the glass roof/canopy of the vestibule jewel box. This was accomplished using tempered glass sidewalls cantilevered from the ground and laminated glass beams spanning across the interior overhead to connect to the fins coming to the ground. 

 

 

The North wall entry featured a pair of doors alongside free-spanning, 6-foot by 9-foot tall insulating structural glass units supported in perimeter channels only.

 

 

For more information on all projects completed and underway by the W&W Glass professionals, go to wwglass.com and look under the portfolio section.

 

W&W Glass LLC is a family owned business with a 70-year history in the metal and glass industry, one of the largest metal and glass companies in the New York metropolitan area and the largest supplier of structural glass systems in the country. We have over two decades of experience in the design and installation of various building enclosure systems, including stick-built curtain walls, pre-glazed unitized curtain walls, Pilkington Planar structural glass facades, and custom metal and glass enclosure systems. We install all of our work with our own dedicated union labor force. W&W is consistently the largest employer of glaziers in the NY metropolitan area.

 

University at Albany Gen*NY*Sis Center

Reflecting Back on University at Albany’s Gen*NY*Sis Center for Excellence in Cancer Genomics

 

Nothing may be more important to today’s generation in healthcare than finding a cure for cancer. This has been no easy feat, even with the dramatic advancements in technology and learning over the past few decades. The University at Albany has always been one of the leaders in several key areas of cancer research working towards this goal. The central mission of the University at Albany Cancer Research Center is to conduct research and provide training related to understanding the genetic and environmental causes of cancer. The basic research mission is focused on the underlying biology associated with tumor initiation and progression, and the development and evaluation of chemopreventive regimens and therapeutic approaches for common cancers. To this end, the Cancer Research Center houses fully staffed, comprehensive, state of the art research facilities. The Cancer Research Center is unique among academic cancer research centers in North America in that it has strong ties to a school of public health. Faculty at the Cancer Research Center are dedicated to providing a collaborative research environment within the University at Albany School of Public Health and its affiliated Wadsworth Research Laboratories of the New York State Department of Health to foster the training of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in cancer biology.

 


Built in 2004, the Gen*NY*Sis Center for Excellence in Cancer Genomics, located just outside Albany in Rensselaer, New York, was constructed to be as provocative as the work done by the world’s most brilliant minds. The architects entrusted with this design were Einhorn Yaffee Prescott (EYP). Gen*NY*Sis was the flagship of the University’s bioscience park and a research destination. The facility was planned around a double-loaded corridor with flexible, adaptable labs on either side, with support labs throughout the floor and “neighborhoods” of offices to foster a shared sense of purpose. The team knew that natural light would be critical to the design scheme, not only being conducive to providing a productive and creative environment but also in helping to reduce mental fatigue on scientists using the technology needed for the research. When they looked to make an impressive transparent lobby entry to this high-tech research facility, the logical choice was to trust the in-state expertise of W&W Glass.

 

 

Working with installers at Patriot Glass, W&W engineered and supplied a large Pilkington Planar™ system for the lobby entrance wall made of clear insulated laminated glass units.  The structural glass fins were comprised of clear 3/4″ monolithic tempered glass connected to face glass with Pilkington Planar™ 905 series hardware fittings. The end result was a stylish, open look with high functionality and great views out on the city.

 

 

The Center included specialized spaces developed for Taconic, a global leader in transgenic mouse models, as well as related services for biomedical research, including a laser capture microdissection (LCM) facility, transgenics core laboratory, and microarray facility. Significant public space accommodates fundraising, scientific symposia, and industry assemblies.

 

 

 

For more information on all the projects completed and underway by the W&W Glass professionals, go to www.wwglass.com and look under the portfolio section.

 

W&W Glass LLC is a family owned business with a 70-year history in the metal and glass industry, one of the largest metal and glass companies in the New York metropolitan area and the largest supplier of structural glass systems in the country. We have over two decades of experience in the design and installation of various building enclosure systems, including stick-built curtain walls, pre-glazed unitized curtain walls, Pilkington Planar structural glass facades, and custom metal and glass enclosure systems. We install all of our work with our own dedicated union labor force. W&W is consistently the largest employer of glaziers in the NY metropolitan area.

Cooper Union Academic Building Helps Blur the Lines Between Art and Funtionality

Iconic Design On the Leading Edge of Creativity

 

Change is tough and sometimes controversial. When change has the prospect of deviating from the norm with a new artistic expression at the expense of losing some history, it can create some tension and anxiety about the outcome. This was not more evident than in the case of a new building for The Cooper Union in New York City. The 150-year old institution’s new academic building, named the the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, is proof that buildings themselves can represent functional art while inspiring creativity; a testament on which the school was founded on. Designed by Thom Mayne of the Los Angeles and New York firm Morphosis, the Cooper Union Science and Art building was conceived as a more radical design that many had not seen in New York up to that point; a bold architectural statement of genuine civic value. Its lively public spaces reaffirm that enlightenment comes from the free exchange of ideas, not just inward contemplation. Nicolai Ouroussoff, architectural critic of The New York Times, praised the building as being an “example of how to create powerful architecture that is not afraid to engage its urban surroundings.”

 

 

The building, originally known as the New Academic Building, stands on the site where the School of Art Abram Hewitt Building was previously located. Construction of the building began in 2006 and was completed in September 2009. It is a nine-story, 175,000-square-foot academic center that houses the Albert Nerken School of Engineering with additional spaces for the humanities, art, and architecture departments in the newest addition to Cooper Union’s campus at 41 Cooper Square. There is also an exhibition gallery and auditorium for public programs and retail space on the ground level.

 

The renovation project had a controversial start in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan. The area around the site consists mostly of low to mid-rise buildings with small commercial businesses on ground level and residential spaces above. Mixed into the scene are various buildings belonging to New York University. The neighborhood was once the scene of early twentieth-century tenements and warehouses and an experimental art and cultural scene in the 1960s and 1970s. Recent projects, most of which are part of the Cooper Union expansion plan, have started to change the modest physical profile of the neighborhood to something much more progressive. Another integral piece of modern architecture introduced into this neighborhood, prior to the New Academic Building, is the Sculpture for Living building (aka Astor Place Tower), a high-rise luxury condo tower, designed by the former strachitect Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects at 26 Astor Place. The site is serviced by two subway lines and many bus routes, which makes it a desirable location for developers. The building does not shy away from this debate by trying to fade into the background.

 

 

Morphosis Architects invited Zahner to join the project team early on in a design assist process. Zahner collaborated with the team to provide engineering, design, and manufacturing for the metal screen building facade. Working very closely with The Cooper Union, Morphosis, and general contractor Sciame, W&W Glass, LLC was chosen as the facade installer for this complex project. W&W Glass was selected based upon their expertise on custom, intricate projects like this.

 

Seen from the old Cooper Union Foundation building across the street, the new building has a flexed, concave facade that is veiled in a glittering perforated metal screen like armor. It’s hard at first to get a grip on the building’s scale from the outside in the day until you see its interior glowing at night with many levels of transparency inside and out. A large vertical slot is cut out of the facade’s center, as if the building’s “armor” had been ripped open.

 

Courtesy of Arch Daily: http://www.archdaily.com/40471/the-cooper-union-for-the-advancement-of-science-and-art-morphosis-architects

 

W&W Glass decided to use a custom Moduline (Oldcastle) window wall system to marry up behind the customized-perforated metal panel scrim system. From afar, small windows appear to be scattered across the building’s surface. Drawing closer, it becomes clear that these windows are actually sheets of punched stainless steel with many building automated operable panel areas for ventilation. Perforated sheets, surfaced in a mechanically-applied “Angel Hair” finish, encompass the entire facade and offer a sustainable, energy saving solution. By controlling sunlight penetration during warm weather and acting as an insulating barrier in cold weather, the skin system promises a 50% reduction in heat load. The video below describes the architect’s vision and the building system functionality in depth.

 

 

Prior to Cooper Union’s expansion plan, the campus consisted of three academic buildings, one for each of the disciplines of art, architecture, and engineering, as well as a seventeen-story dormitory. There have recently been more changes to the campus with a new office tower, designed by Fumihiko Maki, that has replaced the former Cooper Union engineering building on 51 Astor place. Times they are a changin’.


W&W Glass LLC is a family owned business with a 70-year history in the metal and glass industry, one of the largest metal and glass companies in the New York metropolitan area and the largest supplier of structural glass systems in the country. We have over two decades of experience in the design and installation of various building enclosure systems, including stick-built curtain walls, pre-glazed unitized curtain walls, Pilkington Planar structural glass facades, and custom metal and glass enclosure systems. We install all of our work with our own dedicated union labor force. W&W is consistently the largest employer of glaziers in the NY metropolitan area.

 

Gates Hall: Creativity Fit for Any Mind… or Computer!

It isn’t a steel and glass homage to Fenway Park’s famous “Green Monster” in left field, even though it overlooks Cornell University’s Hoy Field baseball diamond.  That being said, every Cornell University “Big Red” fan on the four-level building’s south side gets a season-ticket view from their 160-square-foot offices.  Between games, first-year CIS Ph.D. students get the best view of all – northwestward across campus to a sunset-lit Cayuga Lake.

 

Welcome to Cornell University’s Gates Hall Computing and Information Science (CIS) Building, the home of cutting-edge computer technology.  It’s not a coincidence that the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, who donated $25 Million for this latest campus addition, has their name on this building.  Since information sciences is a highly creative and innovative field, the University wanted a nontraditional design to inspire faculty and students alike.  Curved lines intersecting with linear angles and lots of glass and light were paramount – not just in the common, collaborative spaces but also in every office, lab, and teaching space.  It was critical that everyone who works in computer computation and graphics have bright, open spaces where ideas can flow.

 

Gates Hall

 

Photo Credit: www.ykkap.com

 

Morphosis’ design director and Pritzker Architecture Prize-winner, Thom Mayne, paid close attention to address the University’s needs.  Early in the design process, began in 2012, he promised CIS faculty and students a space “to capture and express the dynamic and transformative power of the discipline it houses.”  $42 million worth of construction later, general contractor Welliver (formerly Welliver McGuire Inc.) and a skilled cast of subcontractors, including one of the nation’s leading glazing contractors W&W Glass, completed the project in late 2014.

 

W&W Glass was part of the design-assist team to help optimize materials and details with the project team to make sure the University and architect got what they wanted within budget. W&W used Erie Architectural Products’ custom structurally-glazed, high-performance unitized curtain wall with outriggers connected directly into steel within the vertical aluminum mullions to support custom perforated metal panel systems supplied by Zahner. Upon closer inspection from inside, the panels function as more than just an exterior decorative screen.  While remaining very transparent, they still provide shading for occupants from the sun and also some foul ball protection due to the close proximity to the field.  This is just one of dozens of green design features that are expected to help the building earn a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) “Gold” rating.

 

Gates Hall

 

Photo Credit: www.azahner.com

 

The professionals at W&W Glass had to be just as creative and inventive as the future students and faculty.  The high-performance, structurally-glazed thermally-broken curtain wall system consisted of roughly 600 unitized frames and 35,000-square-feet of glass. The prefabricated unitized curtain wall system was erected first, with anchor plates and panel assemblies being installed onto the facade in the field afterwards. The main challenge with the system was in the design and coordination of connections and panel assemblies. Zahner and W&W worked very close with the architect to make sure the panels did not overlap and run into each other. Zahner did an excellent job of helping to rationalize the panel assemblies to reduce variations to a limited number of panel sizes with most modifications kept to stand-off lengths and angle of tilt on the panels.  Some other scope areas that posed challenges were the serpentine curved insulating glass eye-shaped entrance and the offset cylindrical interior digitally-printed structural glass wall. The curved entrance had to be laid out very carefully to accommodate the proper splay with patterned-shaped insulating glass units. The orange fritted laminated glass cylinder was four-sided silicone butt-glazed like other walls inside, but presented an engineering challenge for layout.  W&W used Rhino modeling software to help better understand the complex shapes that need to be fabricated. Since this was a Design-Assist project, W&W worked together very closely with the project team and vendors to try and resolve many conflicts up front before there were issues in the field. This was imperative to the success of the project.

 

“It’s our job to inspire students. Bill and Melinda Gates Hall is a real game-changer for Cornell’s Information Science Department,” said Haym Hirsh, Dean of the Faculty of Computing and Information Science.  “Being in one location will facilitate research collaboration – and expand and strengthen the educational experience that we provide our students.”  When people think about innovative, but functional architecture utilizing high-performance glazing systems, W&W Glass, LLC seems to shine through with custom design solutions.  W&W and Morphosis are teaming up again on their next Cornell University project at the new Cornell NYC Tech campus’ First Academic Building on Roosevelt Island. Stay tuned for more details in the future.

 

Gates Hall

 

W&W Glass LLC is a family owned business with a 70-year history in the metal and glass industry, one of the largest metal and glass companies in the New York metropolitan area and the largest supplier of structural glass systems in the country. We have over two decades of experience in the design and installation of various building enclosure systems, including stick-built curtain walls, pre-glazed unitized curtain walls, Pilkington Planar™ structural glass facades, and custom metal and glass enclosure systems. We install all of our work with our own dedicated union labor force. W&W is consistently the largest employer of glaziers in the NY metropolitan area.

Carthage College Straz Center Project Unveiling

 
A Pilkington Planar™ project was recently featured in the The Journal Times for the renovation of the David A. Straz Jr. Center for the Natural and Social Sciences at Carthage College. The overall project features glass-walled classrooms and laboratories, as well as a two-story, glass-enclosed atrium for exhibits, planetarium shows, and presentations.
 
The atrium, consisting of Pilkington Planar™ light grey tinted, low-e coated insulating glass units, provides beautiful views of Lake Michigan. Many are hoping this new wing sparks inspiration for the students. “They’re hungry to learn and I think the space is responsible for that,” Jean Quashnock, professor of physics and astronomy said. Faculty and students are excited about the completion of the project, which they hope will “draw more science students to Carthage.” 
 
For more information about the Straz Center and the ribbon cutting, make sure to check out the full article.

 

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