Saint Barnabus Medical Center West Wing Expansion

Saint Barnabus Medical Center West Wing Expansion

Saint Barnabus Medical Center Changes the Narrative with a Welcoming Structural Glass Entrance

Few expansion or renovation projects are as complicated as those at existing medical facilities and hospitals. There are hundreds, possibly thousands, of things that need to be considered. Renovations or expansions can be even more challenging than new construction because shutting down a 24/7 hospital during construction is not an option. Take Saint Barnabas Medical Center for example, which recently opened the $200 million Cooperman Family Pavilion in Livingston, N.J. The five-story, 240,000-square-foot west wing expansion includes 114 private rooms, an outpatient surgery suite, public atrium, parking, and a neonatal intensive care unit. The facility is designed for a future one-story overbuild expansion.

 


On developments this large, the owner RWJ/Barnabus Health knew they needed an experienced team to ensure they received the quality they desired without sacrificing efficiencies or having a prolonged construction time frame. They selected Francis Cauffman Architects as the design architect and architect of record to work with the construction management team from Wm. Blanchard Company for this endeavor. The reason for the expansion was to establish a comprehensive response to its growing maternity needs in the region. The expansion introduces a wide range of diagnostic and treatment spaces and provides 100 percent private room availability for patients. The specialized obstetrics center manages complex pregnancies and post-birth care, which is not common in a community hospital. The new building is connected through a walkway joining the maternity ward in the existing wing of the hospital to the neonatal intensive care unit in the expansion wing.

 


The overall design plan called for breaking the mold of a stereotypical institutional setting. The focus was set on bringing in ample sunlight and organic, curving structural features to ease visitors into their experience of the building, in contrast to the institutional, claustrophobic nature of many hospital waiting spaces. Since the team quickly realized the entry and atrium design required a heavy structural glass presence, they chose W&W Glass to work with them on the design to help them achieve their aspirations while maintaining budget considerations. The W&W team helped the architect engineer and detail the Pilkington Planar™ point-supported glass system, which would later be installed by the facade subcontractor Boss Glass Company based in Dover, NJ.


The lobby’s glass construction draws the eye into the facility and creates a welcoming, comfortable space for patients and visitors. W&W Glass was an excellent choice to help create this area due to their extensive experience in creating custom structural glass enclosure solutions for medical and hospital facilities across the country. W&W Glass was primarily assigned to set the tone of the entrance and lobby areas so they utilized high-quality, Pilkington Planar™ Optiwhite low-iron, low-e insulating units with 66/33 ProT Low-e on the #2 surface for the face glass units on the vertical walls. The lobby walls were supported by 19mm Optiwhite low-iron monolithic tempered and heat soaked glass fins. All vertical wall panels were supported and secured with ultra-reliable, Pilkington Planar™ 905 series fittings. The transparent two-story, sweeping radiused lobby is the focal point of the building, from both inside and outside.

 


In addition, the new lobby seamlessly connects the existing facilities with the new addition, helping visitors orient themselves. A two-story focal wall with natural imagery takes full advantage of the lobby’s height. A balcony on the second floor offers an alternative, more intimate seating area for sensitive conversations. The tone of the finishes established by the lobby will carry through the interior building design – themes repeat within clinical spaces, creating a unified aesthetic that explicitly ties the caregiving process to the social context in which it exists. This design also coheres with the Medical Center’s existing structures, referencing shape and material patterns in order to better blend into the overall character of the campus. The proposed design updates the St. Barnabas brand and creates a natural transition between the new wing and the old.

 

Courtesy of healthcaresnapshots.com

 

The glass fin lobby transitions to a glass on vertical steel blade system at the entrance area and continues up four stories to form atriums at each level. The blades were very narrow and shallow to limit intrusion into the entrance vestibule and atrium spaces. There were some specific challenges in these details to accommodate fire safing at floor slabs around the steel blades and vertical movements at each floor slab while maintaining a homogeneous look with the face glass. Another challenge with structural glass system was where the glass fins meet the custom fabricated portal “eyebrow”. There had to be special tall notches fabricated into the fins to be able to continue the line of support for the face glass while not putting additional load on the thin header coming across.  At another transition the glass fins continue above the portal area to a roof (while the steel blades continue below the “eyebrow”), but move under a horizontal metal panel feature/slab requiring W&W and Boss to develop some complicated waterproofing and closure perimeter details. All in all, the process to solve these challenges was collaborative in nature with all parties to achieve a fantastic result. 

 

Courtesy of Francis Cauffman Architects


St. Barnabas Medical Center’s west wing also includes a new 141,000-square-foot parking structure with expanded metal panels. The metal panels provided a functional, modern solution that fit with the rest of the hospital campus. With this large expansion the campus is now poised to continue to service the community with top-notch care, additional maternity patient facilities,  and new technology for years to come.

 

W&W Glass LLC is a family-owned business with a 70-year history in the metal and glass industry, one of the largest metal and glass companies in the New York metropolitan area and the largest supplier of structural glass systems in the country. We have over two decades of experience in the design and installation of various building enclosure systems, including stick-built curtain walls, pre-glazed unitized curtain walls, Pilkington Planar structural glass facades, and custom metal and glass enclosure systems. We install all of our work with our own dedicated union labor force. W&W Glass is consistently the largest employer of glaziers in the NY metropolitan area. W&W Glass is located at 302 Airport Executive Park, Nanuet, NY 10954-5285

 

Lyric Market at the Lyric Centre

Lyric Centre Garage Gets a Glassy Feature Wall 

Downtown Houston is about to be a lot brighter and a whole lot more colorful. Just like insects, humans are attracted to light and the prettier the better. Right in the middle of the growing food hall scene, the Lyric Market at the Lyric Centre uses light and glass as a marketing vehicle. The building’s secret weapon is that it’s colorfully lit… it’s not just any place to park your car. It’s a destination. It’s sure to be a hit for everyone wanting to take a selfie or do a quick Instagram post.

 


The Lyric Market (located at the base of the new parking garage next to the Lyric Centre) is part of a gathering of an “all-star” group of at least 18 food vendors and four to six retailers. The $58 million, 31,000-square-foot culinary destination is under the direction of real estate developer Jonathan Enav, the president and CEO of Houston-based U.S. Property Management, who is no stranger to the area as he manages the 27-story Lyric Centre office building. Rhode Island-based Gilbane Building Co. began the project in late 2016 for Houston-based Hines, which is the property manager for the Lyric Centre. The main aspect of the project generating a lot of buzz is the outside of the building. The Market is topped by a seven-level parking garage, clad in brilliant LED-lit panels.


For patrons, the view will be a kaleidoscope of color, but the colors are representative of what is inside – almost like the legend on a map. The exterior, designed by Houston-based Munoz+Albin Architecture, includes LED-lit panels and a striking glass box focal point hovering 60 feet above the sidewalks. The three colors in the site plan indicate different types of venues: pale blue is for full-service restaurants, while yellow and purple are for kiosks with bar seating as well as stalls. The parking garage’s entrance off Smith St. is shown at the curb cut on the left side of the site. The food hall connects to the Lyric Centre through a passage at the office tower’s north end. To check out what it looks like, click here.

 

 

What goes better with light than a large structural glass wall feature to accent the building and continue the magical feel? W&W Glass joined installer Momentum Exterior Systems of Houston to engineer and execute the vertical wall glass fin wall system. The Pilkington Planar™ system designed by W&W Glass includes Pilkington Optiwhite™ low-iron SentryGlas® laminated glass panels for the suspended from glass fins. The walls are connected to Optiwhite low-iron, 3/4″ thick tempered glass fins utilizing standard, countersunk Pilkington 905 series fitting hardware. This glass menagerie adds to the total concept of setting the stage for a unique dining experience from the time the diner drives up in his car until the last bite is taken. The result is that diners will be surrounded by a beautifully designed space crafted with painstaking attention to detail, an exciting atmosphere filled with live music, and the hustle and bustle of an international market all in the comfort of downtown Houston.

 


The project will bring to Houston the latest wave of chef-driven concepts that will dominate the space, which also is expected to include a variety of vendors peddling products such as fresh produce, fresh flowers, artisan baskets, and handmade hats. In total, 34 spaces ranging from 105 to 790 square feet are available for lease. The concept is modeled after international food halls, including: New York’s Chelsea Market, Portugal’s Time Out Market, and Israel’s Sarona Market Local restaurant group Clark Cooper Concepts — behind eateries such as Brasserie 19, Coppa Osteria, and the recently closed SaltAir Seafood Kitchen — partnering with Enav on the project. Plans also call for an underground speakeasy and a second-story open-air terrace and café.

Houston-based landscape architecture firm Kudela & Weinheimer Landscape is designing the terrace with seating, fire pits and a downtown view. Just outside of the hall will be a public plaza centered around the Lyric Centre’s 36-foot-tall “Virtuoso” sculpture by David Adickes. Scheduled to open in the fourth quarter of this year, the plaza will host community programs as well. Another unique aspect to the Lyric Market is the advanced parking garage technology – the first of it’s kind in the area. The Lyric garage has full, license plate recognition technology at every space. Contract parkers can enter and exit without badging in or out. It also has 2 way circulation, all the way, up and down. It eliminates the hassle of a one-way driving thoroughfare complete with color coding to designate empty spaces.


W&W Glass LLC is a family-owned business with a 70-year history in the metal and glass industry, one of the largest metal and glass companies in the New York metropolitan area and the largest supplier of structural glass systems in the country. We have over two decades of experience in the design and installation of various building enclosure systems, including stick-built curtain walls, pre-glazed unitized curtain walls, Pilkington Planar structural glass facades, and custom metal and glass enclosure systems. We install all of our work with our own dedicated union labor force. W&W Glass is consistently the largest employer of glaziers in the NY metropolitan area. W&W Glass is located at 302 Airport Executive Park, Nanuet, NY 10954-5285

Turtle Creek Office Building – Perot Family Offices

Turtle Creek Features Sleek, Transparent Cable Tension Walls

 

The importance of planning and design cannot be over emphasized when constructing a massive office campus– even in Texas. The design of the new corporate campus for the Perot Companies, which manages the prominent Texas family’s various businesses, focuses on community and collaboration at an important urban site. Ultimately, the new campus is designed to address not only changing forces in the climate and site, but also changing forces in the industry. The project consists of two three-story buildings totaling 200,000 square feet over structured below-grade parking that can accommodate 430 cars. Rising nearly 60 feet, the concrete-frame building is organized into two 100-foot-wide office wings, with a central connector space that affords direct access to the adjacent landscape. The structure is clad with glass and limestone, inspired by the water and exposed rock of the creek bed that runs along the site.

 

Located on busy Turtle Creek Boulevard just north of downtown Dallas, the three-story project is on a property that had long been eyed by developers for high-rise development. Turtle Creek is a top-tier creekside, infill development location with a rare six acres zoned for 1.5 million square feet of residential, hotel, or Class “A” office use. Its central position includes good transit options and offers employees shorter commute times than the company’s current locations. The six-acre parcel is encircled by Turtle Creek and the popular Katy Trail, a multiple-user recreation greenway that connects the Turtle Creek residential and commercial neighborhood to the larger Dallas community and downtown.

 


Developers Hillwood and the Perot Families selected Mithun, a Seattle and San ­Francisco–based deep-green integrated architectural firm, to design the new campus, along with Dallas-based BOKA Powell, architect of record, and Dallas and London-based Balfour Beatty Construction to build the project. The new Perot headquarters is specifically-designed to enhance collaboration and communication. Essential to that idea is the three-story, glass-enclosed, 5,500-square-foot central space, providing an inviting, open connection between the two office wings. Other high-performance building and site strategies include daylight harvesting through a high-performance curtain wall glazing system, use of eco-friendly materials, and preservation of a significant amount of existing foliage.

 


The team entrusted the experts at W&W Glass for the design and engineering of two large Pilkington Planar™ point-supported structural glass cable tension walls installed by Oak Cliff Mirror and Glass. The key to the stability and aesthetics were massive vertical walls at the main lobby and the atrium stair area. Systems like this require a very strong perimeter boundary structure of steel or concrete to resolve the tension forces imposed on it. With cables directly behind the joints of the glass, ultimate transparency is achieved as compared to other structural glass systems requiring deep steel or glass members for support. The face glass used on Turtle Creek was a clear low-e-coated insulating glass with HP 69/37 coating on the number two surface to meet the values for the mechanical systems performance. The units were fastened with Pilkington Planar™ 905 series flush, countersunk stainless steel fittings and customized clamped “longhorn” rods to vertical stainless steel tension cables. These areas provide large open spaces and give unobstructed views of the creekside park, the Oak Lawn neighborhood, and Uptown Dallas’ growing skyline.

 


Like many urban centers, Dallas experiences the effects of climate change, with recent record rains and storms having a significant impact on low-lying site parcels. With the surging waters of Turtle Creek adjacent to the site, the project team created building and landscape elements that respond to this threat. The development and the design teams worked with site hydrology experts to finesse needed building and site elements to minimize creek flow obstructions during storms, and the landscape creates large infiltration and open areas to help deal with stormwater surges. The building itself is carefully situated to accommodate 500-year storm events.

 


As is the case with many new corporate buildings, key executive offices are integrated into the office space instead of being located in a commanding top-floor penthouse, making leadership more accessible and directly connected with the rest of the team. The need and desired outcome was to bring together the 250 staff members from Hillwood’s offices in the Victory Park and Uptown areas near downtown Dallas and Perot Group’s suburban location in Plano. It appears the project was quite successful in this feat and was even named in Interior Design magazine as “Best of Year” Finalist for 2017.

 

W&W Glass LLC is a family-owned business with a 70-year history in the metal and glass industry, one of the largest metal and glass companies in the New York metropolitan area and the largest supplier of structural glass systems in the country. We have over two decades of experience in the design and installation of various building enclosure systems, including stick-built curtain walls, pre-glazed unitized curtain walls, Pilkington Planar structural glass facades, and custom metal and glass enclosure systems. We install all of our work with our own dedicated union labor force. W&W Glass is consistently the largest employer of glaziers in the NY metropolitan area. W&W Glass is located at 302 Airport Executive Park, Nanuet, NY 10954-5285

 

Dartmouth College Black Visual Arts Center

Visual Arts Takes Center Stage with Triple-Glazed Glass Fin Facades

 

Creativity comes from many places and in a myriad of forms. The one unifying aspect of creativity is that the creator needs to be inspired and is almost always affected by their surrounding environment. That mantra was exactly the goal of the Dartmouth College Black Visual Arts Center located in Hanover, New Hampshire. Apollo Global Management co-founder Leon Black and his wife Debra contributed $48 million to create a state-of-the-art visual arts center at Dartmouth College. The building’s namesake and benefactor Leon Black graduated summa cum laude from Dartmouth College in 1973 with a major in philosophy and history and received an MBA from Harvard Business School in 1975. Debra Black, an avid lover of the arts and accomplished Broadway producer, graduated from Barnard College in 1976. The 105,000-square-foot facility that bears the Black family name houses the departments of Studio Art, Film, and Media Studies, including a Digital Humanities program. This all-inclusive art center hub contains classrooms, exhibition space, a 40-seat screening room, the 243-seat Loew Auditorium, faculty and administrative offices, and a shared digital humanities media laboratory. This center takes full advantage of advanced technology, and its strategic location in Dartmouth’s arts district of campus, to connect the visual arts with the other humanities and science departments in shaping and preparing students to assume their future roles as artists and cultural leaders.

 

 

For this project, the educational institution looked to an architecture firm that had a wealth of education and “arts & culture” background selecting Boston-based architects Machado Silvetti. The Machado Silvetti team took a neighborhood-based approach, addressing each distinct set of requirements through strategic adjacencies—placing the print-making classrooms and support spaces together in a back chemistry corridor, and keeping the workshop separate from the digital media labs to reduce sound transfer. Uniting all six areas of departments under the one roof had a significant impact on teaching and the possibility for collaboration between studio art faculty members. Also, being housed in the same building with film, media studies, and digital humanities increased the opportunities for multidisciplinary collaboration between students as well.

 

 

The architects worked with construction manager Suffolk Construction to construct the building for the college. Natural light and visual transparency was a key to the overall functionality and tone of the building. W&W Glass worked closely with the architect and installers New Hampshire Glass to create a striking and inviting environment. W&W Glass’ design for the Pilkington Planar™ system vertical lantern walls included triple-glazed, Pilkington Optiwhite™ low-iron silk-screened insulating face glass units with HP 70/39 low-e on the number two surface using a custom white silk-screened custom “frit” pattern on the number three surface as well as non-fritted glazed areas. The triple-glazing was desired by the project team to provide the ultimate in energy performance in New Hampshire’s cold climate. Pilkington is one of the few manufacturers in the world that can manufacture triple-glazed, point-supported insulating glass units. All vertical tempered glass fins were Optiwhite low-iron glass as well for high transparency. All point-supported glass panels were fastened to the glass fins with Pilkington Planar™ 905 series countersunk stainless steel fittings.

 


More than one-fourth of Dartmouth students enroll each year in courses in visual art, film studies, and digital humanities, including theory, criticism, and studio classes. The Black Family Visual Arts Center provides expanded resources for students and faculty alike, including classrooms, faculty offices, an exhibition gallery showcasing student work and a shared digital humanities media laboratory. The center also provides education in photography, architecture, painting, and drawing studios, as well as cutting-edge film production, animation, and editing spaces. 

 

W&W Glass LLC is a family-owned business with a 70-year history in the metal and glass industry, one of the largest metal and glass companies in the New York metropolitan area and the largest supplier of structural glass systems in the country. We have over two decades of experience in the design and installation of various building enclosure systems, including stick-built curtain walls, pre-glazed unitized curtain walls, Pilkington Planar structural glass facades, and custom metal and glass enclosure systems. We install all of our work with our own dedicated union labor force. W&W Glass is consistently the largest employer of glaziers in the NY metropolitan area. W&W Glass is located at 302 Airport Executive Park, Nanuet, NY 10954-5285.

 

 

 

 

 

The Columbia Business School Gets a New Home

The Columbia Business School Gets A New Home – Where Business and Social Experience Meet.

 

These days, it’s not all just about textbook theory and lectures, as the main teaching method at business schools. Due to the changing nature of business and the increased viability of social media as a major source for information and interactions, business schools too are adapting to find ways to become more “social” to increase student engagement and learning to help devise innovative business solutions for the 21st century.

 

The new home for the Columbia Business School is based on an exchange of ideas and social interactions in different settings (formal and informal) combined with advanced technology. Student engagement with the surrounding neighborhood is also a fundamental component with each classroom having view to the exterior neighborhood and landscape.

 

Photo courtesy of Columbia Business School

 

It’s rare to have an opportunity to be able to expand in the highly populated area of Harlem, but after calling Uris Hall home for more than a half century, Columbia Business School has begun constructing a complex located on Columbia University’s new 17-acre Manhattanville campus.

 

To say the new buildings are conspicuous would be an understatement. Columbia Business School’s twin structures will span approximately 492,000 square feet with a 40,000-square-foot open area already nicknamed “The Square”. World-renowned businessmen Ronald Perelman, chairman and CEO of MacAndrews & Forbes Holdings, and Henry Kravis, co-founder and co-CEO of the leveraged buyout firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. donated large gifts towards the construction of the project. Kravis gave a landmark gift of $125 million, while Perelman provided a gift of $100 million for the complex. Both donors are members of the School’s Board of Overseers, while Kravis is a Columbia Business School alumnus. The buildings honor that generosity by naming the twin structures The Ronald O. Perelman Center for Business Innovation and the Henry R. Kravis Building. The new facilities will host graduate-level schools and research centers.

 

Perelman and Kravis are not the only familiar names that will be attached to the project as the endeavor is a large collaboration of some of the best people and firms in the industry. Both structures are designed by the renowned New York architecture firm Diller Scofidio & Renfro (DS+R) in collaboration with FXCollaborative (formerly FXFOWLE Architects) as executive architect. While obvious by the modern appearance in the renderings, the project is not about typical bricks and mortar. There is actually an underlying theme about transforming the School, business education, and the nature of business itself through both buildings integrated flows and expressions of form.

The school tapped Turner Construction as the construction manager but needed a trusted, specialized partner when it came to the sophisticated design and techniques for constructing the primarily glass outer appearance. The team selected W&W Glass as the overall facade supplier and erector who is teaming up with IDA International Inc. of Derby, CT to install the Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete (GFRC) portion of the building and AZA INT – responsible for design, engineering, and fabrication of the glass facade systems, which was the preferred Italian manufacturer selected by W&W.

 

Photo courtesy of Columbia Business School

 

W&W’s selection was based on the firm’s value proposition, bringing an integrated design assist approach and long successful track record in constructing other education facilities throughout the New York City area. Some examples of W&W’s work can be found at the Columbia University Northwest Corner Building and the latest projects at Cornell University’s new Cornell Tech campus at Roosevelt Island showcased by The Bloomberg Center and The Tata Innovation Center.

Both of these new structures at Columbia Business School include a very high level of system coordination and integration for their facades, combining multiple components, installation trades, and companies. There is a significant amount of Business Information Modeling (BIM) that is crucial to this project, as the facades at times bring together three different manufacturers’ products in the same plane. The bespoke design calls for an intricate meshing of glass systems, metal panel, and GFRC panels. The key manufacturers are located in different countries, with glass manufactured in Europe and the curtain wall systems manufacturer AZA INT fabricating products in northern Italy. W&W Glass and AZA INT had recently teamed up together on a New York City project along The High Line called The Getty, designed by Peter Marino Architect. AZA INT is specialized in complete, engineered facade packages. They develop and design unique facade geometries and building envelopes in glass, metal, wood, and other materials for customers.

 

The solution proposed to the team by AZA INT meets the design needs and stringent performance criteria required for this project. It was especially important for these products to have excellent acoustics to cut down on traffic/road noise, with the project site being located so close to the Henry Hudson Parkway. This performance was verified by third-party mock-up testing. That said, the high degree of transparency is certainly the blueprint of Columbia’s project and main goal. The fabricated glass products themselves will be sourced from both Germany and Spain, depending on the facade type. There are three different 4-sided structurally-glazed curtain wall types being used on the buildings:  a stick built aluminum mullion system, a unitized aluminum curtain wall system, and a unitized system fastened onto laminated glass/steel vertical mullions. Overall, the total project requires almost 162,000 sqft of curtain wall. In addition to the glazing systems, there are also varying-shaped horizontal bands of Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete (GFRC) materials that will be made by DKI (David Kucera Inc.), which is located in Gardiner, New York.

 

Photo courtesy of Columbia Business School

 

Most of 2018 is being utilized for mock-up testing, engineering, and coordination of shop drawing details with BIM modeling between trades to alleviate potential conflicts between materials and to best understand how the assemblies merge together with all of the angles, planes, and curves.

 

Recognizing that creativity, innovation, and communication—skills that often flourish in more informal, collaborative environments—are as important to contemporary business school pedagogy as the traditional, quantitative skills best taught in a classroom, the building’s internal spaces are organized around two distinct networks that foster more informal interactions between the student and faculty of the school. The west building Commons is an urban–scale living room for students, faculty, and staff, while the east building Forum is a terraced interior landscape that doubles as a 300–seat lecture hall. Each network is a combination of circulation routes, lounge spaces, dining facilities, and study rooms that facilitate planned and unplanned interaction 24 hours a day. The excitement for the project is continuously building as excavation and foundations are underway, but the finished product is not scheduled for completion until 2021. Stay tuned for more information as the project progresses!

 

For more information on all the projects completed and underway by the W&W Glass professionals, go to www.wwglass.com and look under the portfolio section. W&W Glass LLC is a family owned business with a 70-year history in the metal and glass industry, one of the largest metal and glass companies in the New York metropolitan area and the largest supplier of structural glass systems in the country. We have over two decades of experience in the design and installation of various building enclosure systems, including stick-built curtain walls, pre-glazed unitized curtain walls, Pilkington Planar structural glass facades, and custom metal and glass enclosure systems. We install all of our work with our own dedicated union labor force. W&W is consistently the largest employer of glaziers in the NY metropolitan area.

 

Marist College Lowell Thomas Communications Center

Making a Magnificent Entrance at Marist

 

While many firms tout their expertise in new construction installations, it takes a specialty firm for consultation and erection on high profile renovation projects. Renovations can test the creativity and expertise of even the most sophisticated firms more than new builds due to existing unknown issues and restrictions (often only uncovered upon building probes and demolition). Schedule on these types of projects can also be tight due to the need to limit the duration of time the exposed building area can be open to the elements, current occupancy requirements, and having limited installation time available. These renovations may drastically change the look and feel of the building through repositioning… thereby adding a new entrance, completely remodeling the interior, or dealing with necessary modifications/improvements to meet updated building codes and standards.

 

W&W Glass is one of the few companies that developers, owners, and architectural designers seek out for both new builds and renovations. One such renovation project that W&W’s glazing system expertise was compulsory on was for the glass lobby entrance renovations at the Lowell Thomas Communications Center at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York in 2014. The Lowell Thomas Communications Center originally opened in 1987 and is named after the broadcast pioneer, explorer, and longtime resident of Dutchess County himself who had received an honorary doctorate from Marist in 1981. The Center provides space for communications, math, and computer science studies. 

 


All of the classrooms on the ground and first floors were redone with a modern look and outfitted with modern technology. Each was upgraded to provide a dedicated computer that came with a projector screen and other media outlets. All of the rooms also now have a lighting system which allows for dimming and other selective lighting inside. The ground floor houses Marist College’s radio station, WMAR, which was also renovated for students to use throughout the year. The second floor lobby and outside of the building were upgraded (like many others on the campus) to match the visual design standards of the rest of the buildings with specific types of brick/stone cladding. For the entrance renovations there was a strong desire for more natural light. Working with Hibbs Architects in the Hudson Valley, W&W Glass was selected by the school to aid in design and installation of the transparent Pilkington Planar™ structural glass systems to bring in more natural light and give the entire building a new focal point.

 

 

 

W&W Glass’ team used Pilkington Optiwhite™ low-iron insulating glass units with “K” low-e on the #3 surface for the exterior façades on the East and North of the building. Optiwhite low-iron monolithic fins were used to support the face glass on the East wall main entry mounted with Pilkington Planar™ 905 series stainless steel fitting hardware. One of the most exquisite features of the renovation was a new 18-foot wide by 7-foot deep vestibule with a glass roof and canopy that seamlessly integrated into the all glass facade. 

 

 

The tempered glass fins were made of monolithic glass while the roof, glass beams, and canopy glass used SentryGlas® laminated glass panels for additional strength and stability. The glass vestibule hardware is a combination of standard Pilkington 905 fittings, 902 fittings, spring plates, and custom connections. One of the biggest challenges was the clean integration of the door panic hardware and pivots into the glass roof. Custom stainless steel door headers and close coordination was required to make this area work together. Another major challenge was to support the glass roof/canopy of the vestibule jewel box. This was accomplished using tempered glass sidewalls cantilevered from the ground and laminated glass beams spanning across the interior overhead to connect to the fins coming to the ground. 

 

 

The North wall entry featured a pair of doors alongside free-spanning, 6-foot by 9-foot tall insulating structural glass units supported in perimeter channels only.

 

 

For more information on all projects completed and underway by the W&W Glass professionals, go to wwglass.com and look under the portfolio section.

 

W&W Glass LLC is a family owned business with a 70-year history in the metal and glass industry, one of the largest metal and glass companies in the New York metropolitan area and the largest supplier of structural glass systems in the country. We have over two decades of experience in the design and installation of various building enclosure systems, including stick-built curtain walls, pre-glazed unitized curtain walls, Pilkington Planar structural glass facades, and custom metal and glass enclosure systems. We install all of our work with our own dedicated union labor force. W&W is consistently the largest employer of glaziers in the NY metropolitan area.

 

University at Albany Gen*NY*Sis Center

Reflecting Back on University at Albany’s Gen*NY*Sis Center for Excellence in Cancer Genomics

 

Nothing may be more important to today’s generation in healthcare than finding a cure for cancer. This has been no easy feat, even with the dramatic advancements in technology and learning over the past few decades. The University at Albany has always been one of the leaders in several key areas of cancer research working towards this goal. The central mission of the University at Albany Cancer Research Center is to conduct research and provide training related to understanding the genetic and environmental causes of cancer. The basic research mission is focused on the underlying biology associated with tumor initiation and progression, and the development and evaluation of chemopreventive regimens and therapeutic approaches for common cancers. To this end, the Cancer Research Center houses fully staffed, comprehensive, state of the art research facilities. The Cancer Research Center is unique among academic cancer research centers in North America in that it has strong ties to a school of public health. Faculty at the Cancer Research Center are dedicated to providing a collaborative research environment within the University at Albany School of Public Health and its affiliated Wadsworth Research Laboratories of the New York State Department of Health to foster the training of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in cancer biology.

 


Built in 2004, the Gen*NY*Sis Center for Excellence in Cancer Genomics, located just outside Albany in Rensselaer, New York, was constructed to be as provocative as the work done by the world’s most brilliant minds. The architects entrusted with this design were Einhorn Yaffee Prescott (EYP). Gen*NY*Sis was the flagship of the University’s bioscience park and a research destination. The facility was planned around a double-loaded corridor with flexible, adaptable labs on either side, with support labs throughout the floor and “neighborhoods” of offices to foster a shared sense of purpose. The team knew that natural light would be critical to the design scheme, not only being conducive to providing a productive and creative environment but also in helping to reduce mental fatigue on scientists using the technology needed for the research. When they looked to make an impressive transparent lobby entry to this high-tech research facility, the logical choice was to trust the in-state expertise of W&W Glass.

 

 

Working with installers at Patriot Glass, W&W engineered and supplied a large Pilkington Planar™ system for the lobby entrance wall made of clear insulated laminated glass units.  The structural glass fins were comprised of clear 3/4″ monolithic tempered glass connected to face glass with Pilkington Planar™ 905 series hardware fittings. The end result was a stylish, open look with high functionality and great views out on the city.

 

 

The Center included specialized spaces developed for Taconic, a global leader in transgenic mouse models, as well as related services for biomedical research, including a laser capture microdissection (LCM) facility, transgenics core laboratory, and microarray facility. Significant public space accommodates fundraising, scientific symposia, and industry assemblies.

 

 

 

For more information on all the projects completed and underway by the W&W Glass professionals, go to www.wwglass.com and look under the portfolio section.

 

W&W Glass LLC is a family owned business with a 70-year history in the metal and glass industry, one of the largest metal and glass companies in the New York metropolitan area and the largest supplier of structural glass systems in the country. We have over two decades of experience in the design and installation of various building enclosure systems, including stick-built curtain walls, pre-glazed unitized curtain walls, Pilkington Planar structural glass facades, and custom metal and glass enclosure systems. We install all of our work with our own dedicated union labor force. W&W is consistently the largest employer of glaziers in the NY metropolitan area.

1812 North Moore Elevates the Market in Arlington

1812 North Moore Elevates the Market in Arlington with Spectacular Entrances

 

In the world of real estate, everyone knows location is everything. Located at the center of the Orange/Silver/Blue Metro lines, four bridges to Washington D.C., and five highways between Virginia and Maryland, 1812 North Moore Street in Arlington, Virginia is also just minutes away from Reagan National Airport (DCA), Dulles International Airport (IAD), the Union Station transit hub, and an easy walk/bike/paddle from all over the DC Metro area and surrounding suburbs. This new thirty-story skyscraper with a height of 385 feet is currently the tallest building in the Washington Metropolitan Region, offering many unobstructed views into Georgetown, the Rosslyn-Ballston corridor, the National Mall, and the Potomac River basin. The 580,000 square foot office building is partially constructed over an existing electrical substation, with a “thru-block” lobby hemmed in by the power substation and metro station. For busy commuters, this is an ideal situation.

 

 

The building was originally proposed in 2005 with 39 floors and a height of 484 feet and a tapering design resembling Pelli’s Atago Green Hills Mori Tower in Tokyo. The design was eventually shortened and simplified to its current design, which takes cues from the pyramid at the top of 3100 Clarendon Blvd in the nearby Clarendon neighborhood. Architect Davis Carter Scott, Ltd. (DCS) was selected for the design of the 1812 North Moore project. It is a major component of Arlington County’s redevelopment of the Rosslyn neighborhood. 1812 North Moore provides a dramatic statement to the city skyline and revitalizes pedestrian traffic. The building has already attracted and some attention when Gerber and it’s parent company Nestlé relocated their headquarters there. (Not to mention the attention it attracted originally being designed to be taller than the Washington Monument and near the flight paths of the two major airports!)

 


The building’s skin strategically utilizes varying combinations of reflectivity, transparency, and ceramic frit to provide maximum thermal performance, to enhance the sense of tower height and slenderness, and to minimize the visual impact of tenant build-out when viewed from the outside. The project was designed to earn the LEED™ Platinum Certification and is now among the largest LEED Platinum office buildings in the country.

 

Arlington County
Photo: 1812 North Moore

 


Due to the intricate glass work needed and the developer Monday Properties’ desire to make a grand entrance, the project had required a highly skilled team in W&W Glass to help the architect achieve their design aspirations. Installer Tidewater Glazing worked with experts at W&W Glass to take on the high-span, multi-story Pilkington Planar™ structural glass entrances. The design resulted in two vertical walls (54 foot and 36 foot tall) made of Pilkington Optiwhite™ low-iron insulating face glass units coasted with HP 50/27 low-e on the #2 surface and two entire glass vestibules made of Optiwhite low-iron SentryGlas® laminated glass. For better insulating performance, the exterior units also included Argon fill in the cavity and stainless steel spacers. For this project, a stainless steel bar structure turned out to be the most suitable material to support the structurally-glazed facades. The strength and stiffness of steel is such that supporting elements are of smaller section and depth then could be used when braced with lateral struts or “kickers”.  Thus this created a less obtrusive visual look than would be the case with other commonly-used materials such as aluminum that would need larger attachments at multiple levels, greater vertical box depths, and horizontal mullions in addition to the verticals to support the glass. Glass fins too would have required a greater depth, encroaching into the lobby much further. 

 

 

In many situations, suspended structural glass wall systems will need separation from the base-loaded door portal areas, which was the case on this project. This separation is often created using stainless steel-clad structural steel tube framing. At 1812 North Moore, the transparent interior vestibule was created with a combination of two separate portal frames and laminated glass beams spanning in between thereby adding structure to support roof glass. The face glass for the cantilevered side walls and additional interior vertical support fins are Pilkington Optiwhite™ low-iron monolithic tempered glass. The exterior roof and fascia glass is comprised of Pilkington Optiwhite™ low-iron insulating SentryGlas® laminated glass units with HP 50/27 low-e on surface #2 and also uses Argon fill and stainless steel spacers like the rest of the exterior wall. For the interior overhead laminated fins (supporting the interior vestibule roof) and the interior roof fascia glass, Optiwhite low-iron SentryGlas® laminated glass was used. All main exterior walls were mounted with standard Pilkington Planar™ 905 series fittings to custom 304 stainless steel vertical bar plate beams (braced with horizontal struts) supplied by W&W Glass. The vestibules, however, were complex with multiple angles achieved by using custom formed stainless steel spring plates and Pilkington Planar™ 902 series fittings.

 

 

In addition to the environmental benefits from the building’s sustainable construction as echoed by it’s LEED rating, the project also provided an additional benefit to the community & surrounding streetscapes through improvements to the Rosslyn Metro Station.

 

For more information on all the projects completed and underway by the W&W Glass professionals, go to www.wwglass.com and look under the portfolio section.

 

W&W Glass LLC is a family owned business with a 70-year history in the metal and glass industry, one of the largest metal and glass companies in the New York metropolitan area and the largest supplier of structural glass systems in the country. We have over two decades of experience in the design and installation of various building enclosure systems, including stick-built curtain walls, pre-glazed unitized curtain walls, Pilkington Planar structural glass facades, and custom metal and glass enclosure systems. We install all of our work with our own dedicated union labor force. W&W is consistently the largest employer of glaziers in the NY metropolitan area.

 

Exelon Headquarters – Creating an Iconic Entrance at the Inner Harbor

Exelon Creates an Iconic Entrance at the Inner Harbor

 

Everyone has heard the saying “Actions speak louder than words.” This is certainly echoed in Exelon’s commitment to the city of Baltimore, Maryland. One of last undeveloped parcels on Baltimore’s waterfront at Harbor Point is now the site of Exelon Corporation’s new 473,000-square-foot, 21-story headquarters, housing the firm’s wholesale, retail, and renewable energy operations and its Baltimore-based administrative offices. Exelon’s commitment marked the city’s largest construction project in more than a decade, revitalizing a long-dormant portion of Baltimore’s Inner Harbor. Within the Exelon building is a mixed-use component with apartments located at 1305 Dock Street and podium retail area at the base as well. The company was eager for its new headquarters space to reflect Baltimore and its people, as well as to support Exelon’s culture of encouraging innovation and acknowledgement of the power of ideas. Beyond Exelon’s role as a large employer and economic driver, Exelon also takes its responsibilities seriously to promote economic development and business growth, and improve the city for its residents. Housing approximately 1,500 employees, the new headquarters is a forward-looking showcase of technology and sustainability.

 


The organization wanted to make a statement with the $160 Million structure as the aesthetic reflects the harbor and local community, with Maryland-based furnishings to local art. Generous amounts of reclaimed wood reference the harbor’s docks and walkways; timbers from 70 abandoned Baltimore row houses create a striking focal point as columns in the 600-seat central trading floor. The work of 11 artists based is based on themes of innovation, progress, collaboration, sustainability, and energy are displayed throughout the building.


Collaboration was needed to get the project rolling for the campus as the tower was designed by the architecture team of BHC Architects working directly with construction manager Armada Hoffler Construction to make the owner Beatty Development’s dream a reality. With the Inner Harbor as the setting, the direction called for extensive natural light and dramatic views to the exterior so it’s no surprise that the facade predominantly featured a lot of glass inside and out. Curtain wall installer Pioneer Cladding and Glazing Systems was awarded the task of skinning the complete building. However, when it came to creating the stunning transparent glass fin wall entrance they partnered with Pilkington Planar™ structural glass experts at W&W Glass, LLC. W&W also had worked extensively in the pre-bid process with BHC to provide a buildable and biddable design as they do on many projects. The ultra-clear entryway cube was composed of an interior and exterior vertical glass wall with returns on either side. The exterior and interior face glass was made of Pilkington Optiwhite™ low-iron SentryGlas® laminated glass with “K” low-e on the #4 surface. The two interior soffit glass areas on the left and right side of the cube also called for Optiwhite low-Iron SGP laminated glass while the all of the vertical glass fin elements are Optiwhite low-iron monolithic tempered glass. All of the glass panels are secured to the support fins (both steel gusset tabs and glass) by Pilkington Planar™ 905 series flush, countersunk stainless steel fitting hardware.

 

 

Exelon’s state-of-the-art, trading floor—one of the largest in the U.S.— achieved LEED CI (Commercial Interior) Certificaiton. The interiors walls are modular and designed to capitalize on either harbor views or the revitalized Harbor East neighborhood, underscoring the company’s connection to the community. The building is the largest LEED Platinum certified project in the mid-Atlantic region and fourth-largest LEED ID+C (Interior Design + Construction) Platinum certified project in the United States.


W&W Glass is an expert in developing custom solutions for corporate headquarters, high-end commercial lobbies, college and univeristy facilities, and transportation structures.  You can see our entire portfolio by going to http://www.wwglass.com/portfolio/

 

W&W Glass LLC is a family owned business with a 70-year history in the metal and glass industry, one of the largest metal and glass companies in the New York metropolitan area and the largest supplier of structural glass systems in the country. We have over two decades of experience in the design and installation of various building enclosure systems, including stick-built curtain walls, pre-glazed unitized curtain walls, Pilkington Planar™ structural glass facades, and custom metal and glass enclosure systems. We install all of our work with our own dedicated union labor force. W&W is consistently the largest employer of glaziers in the NY metropolitan area.

 

University of Southern California (USC) Edith and Eli Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research

A Look Back: Careful integration of architectural and engineering elements demonstrates that the whole of a design can be greater than the sum of its parts.

 

 

To say cutting edge would be underselling the University of Southern California Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research. Established in 2006, USC’s stem cell research program regularly hosts more than 200 world-class scientists who are harnessing the power of stem cell biology to treat neurodegeneration; hearing loss; blood, heart and kidney disease; osteoarthritis and bone fractures; and cancer.


Originally conceived in 2005, the project is the product of a public-private partnership between the Keck School, the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, and California’s voter-created California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. Completed in 2010, the five-story, 91,485 square foot structure, located on the university’s health sciences campus, is connected to the adjacent Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute via bridges on each floor and a basement tunnel. The buildings also share support services including steam, soft water, liquid nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. The school tapped ZGF Architects as designers and the general contractor Morley Builders.

 


The overall strategy grew from the facility’s goal of creating an environment that fosters collaboration, discoveries, and expansion. The building is home to stem cell research and regenerative medicine laboratories, housing 15 faculty members and more than 150 staff and students. The researchers collaborate with colleagues at other organizations to translate basic discoveries into new treatments for cancer, neurosciences, cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, metabolic diseases, and immunology/infectious diseases. The building is set on a slope from the south to north elevation. To bring as much natural light into the laboratories as possible, the architects and interior designers from ZGF placed the mechanical systems on the semi-subterranean ground floor. The first floor is dedicated to public functions and includes a lobby and a large seminar room. The upper floors house laboratories and offices.


The entire premise at the institution is doing everything as sustainably as possible. A key feature of the interior—the day lighting—starts on the exterior. The east and west sides of the building have glass façades running the full length to maximize natural lighting in the labs and offices. W&W Glass joined the team due to their outstanding reputation, world-class designs, and engineering prowess on Pilkington Planar™ point-supported cable tension structures. In collaboration with installers at Walters and Wolf (a California-based glazing contractor), W&W Glass’ final design for the east featured Pilkington Optiwhite™ low-iron SentryGlas interlayer laminated, silk-screened glass with a custom translucent-simulated acid etch frit pattern on the #2 surface for the exterior, including vertical wall face glass, roof return, and soffit. The glass was secured to stainless steel tension cables using Pilkington Planar™ 905 series fittings on custom “longhorn” rods clamped to the cables. The interior had a window wall system inboard of the strucuturally-glazed exterior wall with a large cavity in between for air flow, adding a large interstitial space to act as a thermal barrier to provide a complete dual-skinned wall system. This is often known as a “climate wall”, which provides very high energy efficiency. In cooler temperatures, the climate wall acts as an insulating barrier, retaining warmer air inside the cavity. It also acts just the opposite in the warmer months to keep things much cooler. Alternating patterns of transparent and translucent glass areas create engaging oblique exterior views, while maintaining an privacy and glare control in the labs. The outside tall-span structural glass curtain wall, supported by cables, meets California’s stringent seismic requirements, which can be a challenge at times with large continuous spans in high seismic areas like this. 

 


The west façade features a more traditional aluminum curtain wall with low-e glass and additional fritting as an energy efficient tool to reduce heat gain. Angled laminated vertical glass fins on the west also help reduce glare from the afternoon sun without blocking exterior views.


Transparency continues inside the laboratories. There are no obstructions across the building or between the laboratory bench zone and desk/dry zone. The open labs, called neighborhoods, are flanked by support spaces for fume hoods and tissue/cell culture rooms. Circulation paths direct traffic along the exterior walls. The second floor is occupied by core laboratories and the Stem Cell Collaborative and Training Core, part of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). These facilities, which include lab benches, fume hoods, an environmental room, and a sterilizer facility, are used to teach and disseminate knowledge about stem cell research to the USC community and others.

 


The $80 million stem cell center was the first building on the USC Health Sciences campus to receive a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold designation based on the structure’s unique eco-friendly features, sustainable materials used, and green design/construction methods. USC’s stem cell research center also serves as the heart of the Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, as well as the USC Stem Cell initiative, an interdisciplinary, university-wide collaboration that leverages the transformative power of stem cells to develop the therapies of the future.


W&W Glass LLC is a family owned business with a 70-year history in the metal and glass industry, one of the largest metal and glass companies in the New York metropolitan area and the largest supplier of structural glass systems in the country. We have over two decades of experience in the design and installation of various building enclosure systems, including stick-built curtain walls, pre-glazed unitized curtain walls, Pilkington Planar structural glass facades, and custom metal and glass enclosure systems. We install all of our work with our own dedicated union labor force. W&W is consistently the largest employer of glaziers in the NY metropolitan area.

 

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